After winning the European title with England, national coach Sarina Wiegman immediately thought of her recently deceased sister. She kissed her most loyal fan’s bracelet, which she wore on her right wrist during the final.

    “It is a great loss that she is no longer there,” Wiegman said at the press conference after the won final against Germany (2-1). Her sister passed away last month. “She was my buddy. I think she was here and on the bar. I think she’s very proud of me. And I’m proud of her too.”

    Winning the European title was an absolute highlight of an emotional rollercoaster for Wiegman. Not only did her sister die just before the start of the European Championship, but she also missed a match during the tournament due to a corona infection.

    In the end, everything fell into place at a packed Wembley for Wiegman, who switched from the KNVB to England last year to make the priceless ‘Lionesses’ European champion in his own country. Exactly as she had done with the Netherlands five years earlier.

    That she had succeeded again with assistant Arjan Veurink, made Wiegman speechless. “At the award ceremony I thought for the first time: this is unbelievable. We did it for the second time in a row. I don’t realize what we have done yet. I need time for that.”

    Sarina Wiegman celebrates the European title with her assistant Arjan Veurink.

    Sarina Wiegman celebrates the European title with her assistant Arjan Veurink.

    Sarina Wiegman celebrates the European title with her assistant Arjan Veurink.

    Photo: Getty Images

    “You can’t win the European Championship without good players”

    Wiegman started her job in England in September last year with high expectations. Now she says everything came true. “When I started this, I naturally hoped for some things. I knew there was quality and a lot of potential in this country, because women’s football has developed a lot.”

    “But here we had to bring together different people from other cultures”, she referred to Veurink and the manager Anja van Ginhoven who came along. “Everything was known in the Netherlands, but not here. That it turns out like this is something you hope for. It is very nice when it comes out.”

    Wiegman refused to attribute success to herself, even though she led England to the first top prize in women’s football and is only the second England coach to guide a national team to a title.

    “You can’t win a tournament without good players,” Wiegman said at the end of the press conference. “I want to say that again. I also want to thank the staff and the FA. We got everything that makes us so good. Now we’re going to party first.”

    Wiegman and England will be honored on Monday in Trafalgar Square, a large square in London. Only seven thousand fans are welcome at the ceremony. The BBC will broadcast the festivities live from 13:40 (Dutch time).

    Sarina Wiegman’s press conference was interrupted by celebrating players.

    Sarina Wiegman's press conference was interrupted by celebrating players.

    Sarina Wiegman's press conference was interrupted by celebrating players.

    Sarina Wiegman’s press conference was interrupted by celebrating players.

    Photo: Getty Images

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