The topics of the October issue

    genesis

    With “Foxtrot” Genesis made their breakthrough 50 years ago: how the band shaped rock music, lost their singer, found a new one in the drummer, became huge – and what they stand for today

    By Arne Willander, Peter Huth, Sassan Niasseri

    Yeah yeah yeahs

    Singing about the climate crisis, but in cool? After almost ten years, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs surprise with a record that is as current as it is timeless

    By Naomi Webster-Grundl

    Arctic Monkeys

    Far removed from the indie rock of the early days, the Brits captivate with sophisticated soul, delightful puzzles and big ideas. A conversation with Alex Turner in London

    By Robert Rotifer

    Jarvis Cocker

    The Britpop genius tells how he cleared out his attic room in London – and how he was already planning the career of his band Pulp at the age of 15. An exclusive preprint

    false colors

    The Fehlfarben wanted to celebrate the 40th birthday of their groundbreaking debut “Monarchy and Everyday Life” with a new album, but “the plague” got in the way. Now it’s finally done

    By Juergen Ziemer

    Apache 207

    A documentary series tells the career of the rapper Apache 207 from Mannheim. What makes him so successful – and what other current music documentaries are worth seeing?

    By Dennis Sand and others

    the mix

    Ruben Ostlund

    The King of Cannes: Ruben Östlund’s “Triangle Of Sadness” turns the world of beauty and wealth upside down

    By Thomas Hummitzsch

    Courtney Marie Andrews

    After a painful breakup and forced break, the songwriter returns with a determined album and new insights

    By Max Gosche

    power club

    After five years, Kraftklub are back – and they don’t want to become their own cover band

    By Naomi Webster-Grundl

    Q&A: Jim Kerr

    The Simple Minds singer on the new album, moving to Sicily, dreams in Glasgow and his father

    By Joern Schlueter

    Beth Orton

    The former hope Beth Orton moved back to England from Los Angeles – and changed a lot

    By Joerg Feyer

    Nicki Lane

    With Josh Homme as her new producer, the Americana songwriter is now hardened

    By Frank Thiessies

    PLUS

    Bonny Light Horseman, Wanda, “Reservoir Dogs” and some more

    Reviews

    MUSIC

    News from Bill Callahan and 88 other reviews

    RS GUIDE: Brian Eno

    Sebastian Zabel on the sound artist’s work

    FILM, SERIES & LITERATURE

    “Love, D-Mark and Death” and 18 other reviews

    Playlist: New Noises in October

    False Colors “The Last Dream”

    On “?0?”, their first album since 2015, the new wave pioneers show that their razor-sharp sound is still intact. This uptempo piece does not skimp on contemporary criticism – and says goodbye to yesterday’s dreams.

    Beth Orton “Lonely”

    The English singer and songwriter took six years to write her new album, “Weather Alive”. In “Lonely,” Orton projects her longing and fear of loneliness onto a meditative folk slide.

    The Afghan Whigs “Please, Baby, Please”

    Another old acquaintance: Afghan Whigs mastermind Greg Dulli sounds on “How Do You Burn? “ as vital and experimental as in the best alternative rock times of the mid-nineties.

    Nikki Lane “First High”

    After the wonderful “Highway Queen” (2017), the songwriter from South Carolina dares another balancing act between outlaw country and old-time rock ‘n’ roll with the help of Josh Homme.

    Pixie’s Vault Of Heaven

    Black Francis will forever be measured against the Pixies’ early work. But with this mix of post-punk, surf and gothic pop, he still spits more venom than most imitators.

    John Fullbright “Paranoid Heart”

    Most recently, the songwriter from Oklahoma appeared primarily as a producer. On his first solo album in a long time, he finds his style somewhere between country, folk and heartland rock à la Bob Seger.

    Trampled By Turtles “It’s So Hard To Hold On”

    With fiddle, banjo and mandolin, the band from Minnesota succeed in tradition-conscious, soulful folk and bluegrass ballads. “Alpenglow”, the title of her new album, also reveals knowledge of international folk music.

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